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In the week since the senseless murder of George Floyd, we have witnessed a range of intense emotions play out across the country. This painful time has led Cause Effective to re-examine how we can take greater accountability to address the inequalities and injustices that Black people experience, in order to work towards lasting social change and equity.

For the past year Cause Effective has been very proud to partner with Community Healthcare Network (CHN) to help them leverage their fundraising work to provide quality comprehensive healthcare to New Yorkers. As the pandemic hit New York and quickly began to affect the city’s most vulnerable citizens, CHN team did not hesitate to partner with the Office of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo to operate the Jamaica, Queens COVID Testing Site, one of five sites available to all New Yorkers.

Today, Cause Effective lifts up Trail Blazers as a great example of nonprofit resiliency! The executive leadership and board of directors met early on when they knew COVID-19 was becoming a real threat to the residents of New York City, New Jersey and to their program services. The Board of Directors and Executive Director convened a special Task Force that meets on a weekly basis to ensure the sustainability of the programs and staff. Furthermore, the full Board of Directors convenes every other week.

As the world continues to deal with the devastating impact of COVID-19, the leaders of many nonprofit organizations are making tough decisions that threaten the very core of their organization and whether it will be even in existence. There are many executive directors and boards of directors having to cut back programs and services, lay off staff and cutting salaries.

Cause Effective partners with hundreds of organizations each year that make a difference in communities throughout the Tri-State area. One of our nonprofit partners is Children of Promise, NYC (CPNYC) an organization that for ten years has provided after school programs and services to children and youth who have parents that are incarcerated. Like so many nonprofits, COVID19 has affected the ability for many organizations to serve the needs of some of the most vulnerable people in New York City.

We learned after 9/11, the crash of 2008 and Hurricane Sandy that the first steps in any crisis is not to jump into tactics, but to explore whether your organization’s internal culture and case for support are clear and inspiring to meet the challenge. Strengthening your culture and case for support not only prepares you to navigate this pandemic, but also positions you for success in the future.

There’s a lot being written about the nonprofit sector’s need to prepare for a changing of the guard of nonprofit leadership – generational, racial, cultural, demographic... But in the fundraising realm, so dependent on relationships, how might this leadership transfer impact how nonprofits are finding support, and who is raising money on their behalf?

It’s hard not to be riveted to the national political scene nowadays. When every day brings new twists and turns, it can feel like stepping back for even a few hours means missing a crucial development.

The dollars can be deceiving. As in: “Our Board give/get is $10,000 and most board members make that number.” Or: “Our board all gives quite generously.” What’s wrong with that picture? What’s wrong is what’s missing – the board as ambassadors.

The 2018 numbers are in: Giving to nonprofits is down, especially small and mid-sized gifts - and increasingly, mega gifts are carrying more of the load. Is this good – or bad? What does it mean for those of us on the front lines of relationship-based fundraising?

I’ve seen a couple of boards lately that are paralyzed by the materials paradox – they can’t get started going out and asking for money because their materials aren’t ready, and they’re running out of money and volunteer enthusiasm because they’re not going out and asking for money.

Put a group of fundraisers in a room and there’s likely to be some griping about how difficult it is to raise money, especially in these times. The political climate is diverting from our mission.